Issues : JET is a peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal : Journal of Ergonomic Technology (JET)

Journal of Ergonomic Technology (JET)
ISSN 2432-1575

Issues

A study of inpatients’ activities (ADL) in hospital
Publish Date : 2001/03/01  Vol.1
Authors : 
Chizuko OHGAWARA, Saitama College of Health
Report Outline : 
Technical note
Appeared on Ergonomics of Human System Interaction Vol. 1, No. 1, 96/101, 1994

Purpose of this study is to develop guidelines on hospital environment of recovering from their illness. We observed the activities of inpatients using a video-tape recorder and we performed time study. In two cases, we could point out some promotive and obstructive factors that affected leaving their sick bed and activities of daily living development.
Count : 130
Evaluation of the arousal level and blink detection
Publish Date : 2001/03/01  Vol.1
Authors : 
Yuka MORIYAMA, Yutaka TOMITA, Satoshi HONDA, Keio University, Japan
Report Outline : 
Original article
Appeared on Ergonomics of Human System Interaction Vol. 1, No. 1, 90/95, 1994

In this paper a basic study is given of the relationship between arousal level and blinks. The arousal level was defined as ‘Normal level’ when the subject was wide awake and the tasks were done correctly, and as ‘drowsy level’ when the subject was almost falling asleep and the tasks were not carried out. Blinks were detected by surface electromyogram (EMG) of orbicularis oculi muscles and also by a photo-sensor. The results show that (1) variance of intervals of blinks were larger in drowsy level, (2) duration of EMG was longer in drowsy level, (3) time delay of the closure of the eyelid after the onset of the EMG was longer in normal level, and (4) frequency components of the EMG changed to lower frequencies in drowsy level. From these results, detecting changes in blinking may be used effectively as information of the human mental state.
Count : 125
On force sensors for nursing
Publish Date : 2001/03/01  Vol.1
Authors : 
Koichi OGAWA, Takahiro MORIYASU, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Japan
Report Outline : 
Original article
Appeared on Ergonomics of Human System Interaction Vol. 1, No. 1, 82/89, 1994

The design of a nursing robot or a human lifter will require force data in order to construct the machines. This paper deals with the development of force sensors for nursing movement. The sensors are applied by four-active-strain-gauge method. A nurse puts on the force sensors to her hands and/or feet like gloves and a pair of shoes. It can be measured the forces during nursing movement such as transference of a patient. The principle of strain gauge force sensors is showed, and is proven experimentally the action of the sensors by the use of the two models. Finally the experimental force sensors are described and demonstrated. The experimental force data were obtained through transferring patients from supine position to a sitting position on a bed.
Count : 131
A model of causal relations between feelings in a sensory test
Publish Date : 2001/03/01  Vol.1
Authors : 
Shigeru ICHIHARA, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
Report Outline : 
Technical note
Appeared on Ergonomics of Human System Interaction Vol. 1, No. 1, 71/73, 1994

The feelings of 105 cloths: 21 colour conditions and 5 weaving conditions, were evaluated by 45 undergraduate students. Causal relations between feelings were examined by using a structural equation model. The model was fitted for 22 subjects. It was suggested that the preference difference of cloths between subjects was caused by the causal relations between feelings.
Count : 117
Tokyo city landscape – a comparison of university student preference –
Publish Date : 2001/03/01  Vol.1
Authors : 
Eitaro MASUYAMA, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
Report Outline : 
Original article
Appeared on Ergonomics of Human System Interaction Vol. 1, No. 1, 65/70, 1994

Fifteen slides of various Tokyo landscapes were shown to two groups of undergraduate students. One group (21) attended the Women’s College of Fine Arts (WCFA) and the other group (14) attended Sophia University (SU).
Students rated each slide by Semantic Differential (SD) Method. The results were subjected to a computer correlation matrix and subsequent principal component analysis. Following varimax rotation. We interpreted the results as follows. WCFA subjects preferred the following landscape descriptive factors: ‘ugly’, ‘alive’, natural’, and ‘empty`. Whereas SU subjects preferred the factors: ‘ugly’, ‘primitive’, ‘alive’, and ‘complex’. We note that both groups use two common facto, i.e. ‘ugly and ‘alive’. Using the four factor scores as independent variables and preference ratings as dependent variables, multiple regression equations were computed for the data. For the WCFA responses, we conclude that ‘the more beautiful, more full, more alive and more natural the scene is, the more preferential it is’. Conversely, for the SU responses, we conclude that: ‘the more beautiful, more alive, more complex, and more civilized the scene is, the more preferable it is’. In conclusion, the preference order for Tokyo landscapes for both groups was computed with a resulting rank correlation coefficient of 0.893.
Count : 119
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